Good Morning Accra!

Ghana demonstrates a reality that is awkwardly still commonly ignored in the media image of Africa.
Based on democratic elections, a growing economy, promising yet another boost with the recent discovery of oil sources off it's coast and the constant rising number of tourists, this country is gaining a leading position in Westafrica.
An atmosphere of change that is noticeable in Ghana's capital Accra.
Yet where exactly is the journey heading?
This feature portrays local creatives; cultural producers, artists and performers.
Asking them:
Where does your country stand?
Where are you heading, which are your ambitions? Do you feel as beeing part of a so called new Africa? Are there ways and strategies for you to contribute in shaping the future?

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Nicolas Wayo, 34 is an commercial artist using a large variety of techniques. He holds workshops for Students travelling from the US and Europe to learn his techniques in billboard painting.

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The central Market in Accra

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Home of spoken word artist Mutombo

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Young fashion designer in her home

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Accra-based Spoken-Word Artist,Poet and Lyricist, Percy Mutombo has earned his stripes as a captivating performer over the years, his current album has been released by Pidgen Music Entertainement

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Reggie Rockstone, returned from NYC to Accra in 1994 and pioneered the Hip-Life movement, a uniquely African music genre in Ghana's capital Accra.
Rockstone raps in Twi, Pidgin English and English. His Lyrics focus on social and political themes.

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Yaa Pono emerging to be one of the most-talked about Rappers in Ghana, thanks to his freestyles on Facebook and Youtube . Pidgin Music has taken him under it's wings.

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A young woman beside a phone booth in James Town, the capital's oldest district

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20-year-old Benedicta Tweneboah represented Ghana 2009 at the african supermodel competition, Face of Africa. She's dressed in a robe from empress collection, a fashion designer based in Accra.

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Kay-Ara, 19 raps his lyrics in local Pidgin English. "It's not difficult to break through with music here, if you have a good song that people can dance to, you pay the DJ 1000 Cedi (7US$) and he plays it". His sound engineer, Roger prefers Coldplay and Linkin Park.

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Trashy Bags makes recycled eco-friendly bags and gifts from plastic trash

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The young ivorian fashion designer Fomeya studied in Paris, returned to Abidjan and finally settled in Accra where she features her authentic work in Accra's swanky Osu area.

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Billboard painter trainee

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Tacitus is Pidgin Music's networker

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Yaa Pono emerging to be one of the most-talked about Rappers in Ghana, thanks to his freestyles on Facebook and Youtube . Pidgin Music has taken him under it's wings.

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Accra-based Spoken-Word Artist,Poet and Lyricist, Percy Mutombo in his home. The performer has his current album released by Pidgen Music Entertainement.

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Mutombo, a spoken word artist with a friend in the house of Producer Panji Anoff a melting pot for artists in Accra, here they can record their music, write lyrics and network with other muscians.

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Singer and song writer Doycee rehearsing in the stairway of Mixdown Recording Studio.

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Free open air concert during the High Vibes Festival in Accra

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Opening Night of the High Vibes Festival in Reggie Rockstone's Office, one of the hottest clubs amongst the young and young at heart.

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Robbie, 27 completing his daily workout at the outdoor Power Ranger Gym in Tema, a seaport 15 miles outside Accra. Every single piece of exercise equipment is of the gym members own making.

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Daily workout at Macho Rappers outdoor Power Ranger Gym in Tema. Every single piece of exercise equipment is of the gym members own making.

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Underground lyricist and Bodybuilder Macho Rapper, also known as the Hiplife Bouncer walking his hood in T.M.A.

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Underground Lyricist Macho Rapper and his Boys build the Power Ranger Gym in Tema, Accra 15 years ago. All equipment is handmade.

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Daily training at the Power Ranger Gym, a place Lyricist and Bodybuilder Macho Rapper build with his friends.

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A young woman crosses the street dressed in an item of Empress Fomeya's authentic african collection. The young fashion designer features her works in Accra's swanky Osu area.

Skills to Survive

An estimate of 38 000 children work in the streets of Kabul. They will most likely belong to a part of the Afghan society in the future that never got the opportunity of training.
Without education the possibilities in contributing to changes and paving the way for a sustainable future will be limited.
Since 1995 Aschiana centers provide services and support to street working children and their families for better survival.
A basic education in several areas, offers affected young Afghans an opportunity to develop their skills, learn their rights and manage their income.
When schools were forbidded for girls Aschiana established home based schooling, helping around 45 000 girls through this period.

Clean & Serene

Clean and Serene Vaduz, Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein's population is under 35'000 people, yet it is registered home of 70'000 companies and 15 boutique banks.
There is just one anachronism in this modern thriving state: a ruling prince who has little time for the niceties of democracy. Oddly, his subjects seem equally bemused by it's appeal.

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Gutenberg castle

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The village of Balzers.Most of Liechtenstein's towns are foud along one road at the base of the Rhätikon mountains

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Institute of Architecture and Planing at Liechtenstein's university

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Hotel owner Adrian Drill

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Thérèse and Felix Real. Felix was the chef at the weddings of both prince Hans-Adam and Prince Alois. He is a staunch royalist.

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Prime Minister Otmar Hasler, next to a portrait of Prince Hans-Adam

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Tom Pawlofsky a project manager at the institute of Architecture and Planning at Liechtenstein's university

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Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein has a special focus on contemporary art and it's roots in modernism.

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Norman Oeri, managing director of Liechtenstein Landesbank

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Institute of Architecture and Planing at Liechtenstein's university

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Royal vineyard

Gender Equality

In 2004 King Mohammed VI revised the family code named the Moudawana in the Moroccan law, adressing the women in his country more legal rights for ex. the one to file for divorce, issues of child custody and the right to work.
A journey across the kingdom proves:
Moroccan women benefit from the new opportunities and have gained a strong position in several previously male bastions on the labour market.
Still the implementation of the Moudawana progesses very slowly. Because the modern law is more ambitious than it's reality and re-thinking gender equality within the Moroccan society is difficult, for it inevitably clashes with separate traditional family laws which are an untouchable symbol of Muslim Identity.

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»Today we have a new consciousness - there is no way back.«

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The Hassan- II mosque in Casablanca is the third-largest in the world and holds the highest minarett, but most of all it's a popular and lively meeting point.

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Hakim Bajaja in her evening class of women aged from 10 to 60-years, when the goverment cut her salary the women held a sit-in protest, convinced that everyone has rights to education, Hakim now teaches voluntarly.

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These women from province Skhirat Témara fought for their right to visit school during evenings.

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20-year old Rim studying to be a movie director in Marrakech feels she lives in a country where the individual has very little saying, something that enrages her daily.

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Girls playing at a public place in the old medina, Casablanca

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Children playing and swimming at the mouth of Oued Bou Regreg river which separates Rabat from Salé

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Rim, a student of film direction in Marrakech has no plans of leaving her country for Europe, instead she's determinated to waken society with her future films, which in her eyes is still necessary in spite of the progress the country has made.

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Many young women dress western and but cling on to a very traditional thinking.

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How modern is Mohammed VI really? For the female population he has done alot, this most women agree on but still gender equality is moving too slow in the eyes of a majority.

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One catch of the new family law is that a woman has to prove her achievements during the past years of marriage in order to receive financial compensation.

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Nadia Lamlili, Chief editor of the economics magazine »Économie/Entreprises« and award winner of the CNN french press award 2005.

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One catch of the new family law is that a woman has to prove her achievements during the past years of marriage in order to receive financial compensation.

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View of the Twin Center with it's towers on Boulevard Zerktouni in the country's economic hotspot Casablanca .

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»Morocco has it's head in Europe and it's feet in Africa, I love my country but not so much the contradictions we live with. It has made out of us a nation that is constantly forced to shift between extremes. On one side the conservative social mores on the other the modern times.» Nadja Lamlili chief editor of Économie/Entreprises

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Islam and feminism are Asma Lamrabet's favorite subjects, the doctor and author wears her headscarf by conviction. »The coran is a spiritual text«,she sais, »a help for orientation, not a code. Nowhere in the coran it is written that a man has the right to disown his wife, even if this keeps beeing claimed.The Moudawana deals with this.«

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Job-related, women have found their position in Morocco, but a majority of men still prefer a woman who's willing to subordinate herself to men in marriage and society. Women pursueing their career often stay alone.

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A young rider of the vivid horse-riding games and fighting tradition, Fantasia. Since 2008 also women have access to the competitions.

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Lawyer and bestselling author, Fadéla Sebti, has prepared marriage contracts for several years and helped rewrite the new family law. The biggest achievement of the reformed family law in her opinion is by far the legal right for women to file for a divorce, even if turning it into reality still has it's flaws.

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Fatima studies computer sciences at the elite university Al Akhawayn in Ifrane, » I feel we have the same chances as men in this country as long as we don't get emotional, - we just have to be a little tougher than them«.

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The new law may well be progressive, but the population wasn't prepared for these changes. Too little is beeing invested in education, approx. 50% of the women in this country are analphabets». Asma Lamrabet, doctor and author specialised in islam and feminism

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It seems, in contrast to the young men, of whom many still dream of leaving for Europe, the moroccan women want to stay and continue improving their quality of life right where they are.

Risky Start

In Tanzania being pregnant and giving birth is extremely risky and a matter of life and death. Every hour one woman or her baby dies and of those that survive thousands develop life-long disabilities, women and newborns. The majority of these deaths and disabilities could be avoided.
But the state-run hospitals lack of adequate infrastructure, professionally trained staff and room to meet the demand. There for CCBRT-a non-governmental origanisation which already runs a well established hospital for people living with disabilities is building a new hospital in Dar es Salaam, the Baobab Maternity Hospital and training staff in the state-run hospitals in place.

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The women in labour share the few beds available in the overcrowded waiting room of state-run hospital Téméké. Many women travel for hours from rural areas to deliver at Temeke hospital, but the medical assistance they find here, barely increases the chances of survival for them and the newborn.

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Shortly after delivery this mother checks her baby for symptoms of disabilities. The midwife doesn't have time to examine the newborns in between deliveries. In most Tanzanian hospitals it goes unnoticed if something is wrong with a child.

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A woman is handed out her baby in the overcrowded waitingroom. Shortly after giving birth mother and child are required to leave the hospital making room for newcomers.

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The few nurses on shift in the maternity ward, lack of professional expertise in order to assist their patients.

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»Do you white women also have labor and birth pains«, this woman asks the swiss journalists having travelled to Dar es Salaam to get an impression of the condition under which women give birth in the 4 Million metropolis.

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Women who's babies didn't survive birth recover sharing the same bed with other mothers and their newborns. For the babies the infection risk is extremly high lying so close to other newborns after leaving the womb.

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In Tanzania it's common to wait two weeks before giving the baby a name, the chances that it may not survive it's first days of life are high, worries that overshadow the parents happiness during this risky period.

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Delivery room at health center Vijibweni is better equiped compared to others. Still they're running short on staff, electricity, equipment and clean water.

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In state-run hospital Temeke every twenty-third newborn dies, that's more than two per day.
Up to two women per week don't survive the birth of their child.

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A women washing her things at hospital Temeke. She gave birth to her child two hours ago.

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Administration work eating away time on behalf of the women and newborn needs,- a nurse is neatly listing the numerous hospital admissions and deliveries.

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There are 10 beds to share for the sixty-four exhausted women which have given birth in the previous hours, even in complicated cases they are required to leave the hospital after latest six hours. The patients need to bring their own tea, food and hygiene articles.

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Two newborn layed on a bed till someone finds the time to examine them. Their mothers have already returned to the waiting room, patiently waiting to see and hold her child.

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Dr. Rukia Msumbi, is responsible for the Vijibweni Health Center a small suburb of Dar es Salaam and one of the few in this position who truly follows the ambition to improve the care for mothers in her facility.

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Young mother breastfeeding her baby the first time at Vijibweni Health Center

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Fistula ward at the CCBRT non-governmental clinic treating fistula patients since ten years. A disability that often occurs from difficult, insufficiently assisted deliveries, for ex. when women lie in labour for too long.
»We repair damage that could have been avoided in the first place«, sais Dr. Brenda D'Mello, »Fistula is a home-grown issue«.

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Doris, a two-year-old patient at the CCBRT non-governmental Clinic for disabilities.
CCBRT is now building the Baobab Maternity Hospital alongside with coaching the state-run hospitals in improving their maternity wards.

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Gynecologist Dr. Brenda D'Mello is the technical manager for the construction of the Baobab Maternity Hospital CCBRT is building. To avoid it beeing overrun once it opens it's doors, Dr. Brenda is also responsible for the training programme in the state-run hospitals and clinics trying to improve the situation all in all. A duty which demands negotiation skills, patience, persistence and strong nerves. »I need to be needed«, sais Dr.Brenda.


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A baby with clubfoot, a deformity of the feett, is beeing operated at CCBRT.
In most Tanzanian hospitals it goes unnoticed if something's wrong with the newborn.
The operation can heal the childs feet completly if proceeded early enough, CCBRT provides free medical services for children below five years of age. The organisation's youngest project is the constructing of a new maternity hospital.

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Everyday rounds at CCBRT's eye ward. The non-governmental hospital treats people with disabilities. It's services are accessible to all who need them. The organisation is building a new maternity hospital and trains staff in state-run hospitals already in place.

Dark, Noble & Fair

Madagascars northwest region with it's tropical climate and original, natural condition thrive a wide range of exotic plants. Above all the evergreen cocoa trees, famous for the excellent quality of their pods. The most nobel of all varieties, the Criollo, has become rare to find.
Felchlin, a Swiss niche manufacturer of noble-grade cacao products and specialist of superior Grand Cru Chocolate, buys a relevant part of finest cacao beans from this area.
In order to ensure their high requirements on quality, they've build up good direct relationships with the cocoa producers, mostly small cooperatives, over the years.
Peasant farmers which follow a traditional form of agriculture farming in an ecologically sustainable manner, as they can't afford pesticides and fertilizer.
Felchlin rewards the selected quality they produce by paying more than the average Fairtrade price.

IDP

The fighting between government troups and militants in the Pakistan Swat Valley in May 2009 trapped over 2.4 million civilians in an actual warzone, a majority of them farmers. Forced out of their homes shortly before the harvest, they left their cattle and crops behind. The following images were taken end of may 2009 in two camps set up in the surrounding area of Peshawar to shelter affected families and individuals, officially now refered to as internally displaced persons, IDP. These kind of camps bear the axis of humanitarian crisis: the unthinkable emotional confusion on one far end and on the other the calculated logistic measures which dealing with this situation requires.

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Residents gather at the camp administration in hope to find a missing relative or friend
among the new-arrivals. camp Shah Mansoor Swabi has registered 12‘756 persons, with
2000 tents it has reached its full capacity.

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Nine year old Fathima from Swat Valley arrived with her mother at camp Shah Mansoor
Swabi sixteen days ago

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daily update of new arrivals at camp Jallozai, Nowshera district.

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Set up for refugees from Bajaur and Mohmand, camp Jallozai has over the past weeks
registered 8397 new families arriving from Dir, Swat and Buner.

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»Most of the 40 pregnant women currently sheltered in the camp are in critical state. Many have suffered from long exhausting walks.« explains Shakila, a Lady Health Visitor put in place by the government at camp Shah Mansoor, is supported by a little team of female IDPs experienced in basic health care.

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Entry to the improvised school at camp Shah Mansoor Swabi

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Daily the school set up by the NGO Muslim Hands in Shah Mansoor counts 50 new registrations, mainly girls. At this moment 550 children received free education from volunteers who themselves live as IDPs in the camp. Biology teacher Hidyal Ullah, 21 from Swat explains »These kids have been banned from school since several months by the militants, they can‘t fall back
further, we need to make up for lost time«.

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With temperatures inside tents rising up to 48 ° in camp Jallozai, the stock of fans is just as
strictly protected as the food supplies.

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Khwaga, 27, escaped with her children from the tribal agency Bajaur during the military
offensive against the militants. Her husband, a farmer, succeeded to save three cows from his
herd, selling fresh milk and yoghurt in the camp provides the family with a little income.

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Six-year old Kainat and her little brother Hussna, refugees from Bajour have recently lost
their father. Their mother, a widow at the age of 23 has one wish »I've registered
my daughter for the camp school which UNCR is building, I want her to have an education.
Unless the militants surrender we‘ll stay here«.

Au Nom de la Musique

He grew up in a family of musicians nearby Lausanne. In Marseille he planned to do his doctor in social sciences. Instead Matthias Nagy went to Africa, became a Radio-DJ and together with friends founded a Swiss-Ivorian music agency in Côte d'Ivoire's capital Abidjan: Nouchy Arts, in line with the local slang Nouchy, a mix of different native languages and french.

You can't possibly speak of Nouchy without mentioning NASH, the queen of word skills. She raps her powerful lyrics mainly about gender issues in her country - as much deep as amusing - in a speed and style that's hard to beat.

Patterns of Success

Colorful fashion fabrics belong to the daily West-and Centralafrican scene. Center for trading textiles lies in Lomé, capital of Togo. A business run by women, some of which were once referred to as »Mama Benz« for the great fortune they made,-mostly in collaboration with the dutch textile company Vlisco. A brand with a small post-colonial aftertaste but with unbeatable quality. Over decades the experienced merchants were free to choose a design with exclusive right of distribution. Currently Vlisco launches collections faster, allocating the dealers with a little of every design. Additionally these compete with cheaper chinese copies. As for consumers, they've kept ambition of achieving a certain status by purchasing the original prestigious Vlisco product and particularly young people filter their inspiration for styles from all over the globe, only they'll have their version of Skinny Jeans tailored in fabric, named »C’est le moment«.

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Students hanging out at the beach sidewalk of Lomé in the latest styles, they may have a low income, the average salery is 80US$ a month, but would never skip regular visits to the tailor.

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a group on their way home from sunday service in Lomé

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Madame Lawson belongs to the greatest wholesale dealers of the coast. Her mother was the first woman in the business to earn the title Mama Benz. Mme Lawson herself keeps her mercedes in the garage she prefers cruising in a 4x4.

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An employee of Manatex loading a taxi at the warehouse with the new collection

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A lot of the new collection stacked in the warehouse of Vlisco

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Vlisco's main stock location of the Westcoast in Lomé capital of Togo

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The new collection has arrived at VLISCO warehouse, an employee of distributor Manatex is sorting out their lot. The distributors can order the patterns from the catalogue but in the end it's the manufactor Vlisco who assigns the fabrics to the different businesses. Every trader hopes to get the lucky lot in colours and patterns.

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Expensive goods, rolls of the best wax quality Vlisco fabric in the warehouse

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An employee carries her heavy weight by foot to the market stall, she required the help of four collegues to load the bundle on her head.

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Boulevard du 13 janvier the main road in the center of Lomé capital of Togo

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Student Sika dressed in a creation named Piment according to the similar look with the local chili pepper. The local tradition of naming a pattern or design goes way back and the enclosed metaphors are very entertaining.

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Saleswomen from the market pick up their choice at the wholesale boutique of Sonja Bahun, the temper risesas each woman knows exactly which patterns sell best and wants to secure her lot.

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Sonia Bahun, 20 followed the family tradition and is currently the youngest wholesale dealer in Lomé. "My mother used to pass orders on little scraps of paper, I took care of that with my laptop."

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Two saleswomen from the market have picked up their lot from the new collection. Experienced in what the consumer wants, they make their choice in pattern and color in no time.

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Marguerite Lawson carries on her mothers legacy of the golden days, the women have assembled a great deal of fortune merchandising Vliscos fabrics aswell as creating own textile designs. The market present today has become difficult for wholesellers like Manatex, with chinese and indian companys producing cheaper copies of the popular Vlisco patterns at high speed.

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Sonia Bahun, 20 followed the family tradition and is alongside her sisters currently the youngest wholesaler in Lomé. "My mother used to pass orders on little scraps of paper, I took care of that with my laptop."

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Chantal Zekpa, 35, executive secretary, keeps her outfits ordered in three categories: work, church and home. Sundayevenings she plans out her daily outfits for the week from head to toe.

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Women selling fabrics off the street, many of these are china made affordable copies from the exclusive Vlisco collection

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Marguerite Lawson surveys carefully over her business in Boutique Manatex

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On second floor of Manatex 200 photographs document the life of the family female run business, Marguerite Lawsons mother worked her way up from an analphabet to a multimillionaire in fabric distribution and textile design.

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The new collection is displayed immediatly at Manatex. On advanced payment Manatex has already sold 80% of the merchandise to foreign dealers, women from Benin, Burkina Faso and Nigeria.

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Marie-Anne has installed her tailor atelier on the porch of her home. The scissors and ruler were a gift from Vlisco, the company is omnipresent.

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Papa Souza, 52, in a confortable suit

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Chantal Zekpa, 35, executive secretary, keeps her outfits ordered in three categories: work, church and home. Sundayevenings she plans out her daily outfits for the week from head to toe.

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Essie, a student in her twenties recalls a time when it was totally unhip to wear local fabrics in university, so the goverment obliged every citizen to dress in traditional fabrics on fridays. Today it's common for all generations to have their wardrobe tailored in local fabrics.
Skinny jeans? Sure but we call this cut c'est-le-moment- and it'll be in cotton with a funky design.

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A young girl with YSL foulard and a dress cut from high quality Vlisco fabric.

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Koko, an office employee spends most of her small on good quality fabric, preferably from the dutch company Vlisco, the companys post-colonial aftertaste doesn't seem to bother her. Touch it, 100 % cotton see this you will wear a lifetime and the colours won't fade in the sun, and they reach out to the heart!

Bourbon-Vanille

Vanilla, from the worlds main export country Madagascar, is known as Bourbon-Vanille.
The traditional production amongst the farmers from the Northwest and the hot damp climate have permitted for this region to cultivate the worlds best vanilla. 70% of the population in this area survive by growing vanilla. 620 farmers from 20 villages have formed two cooperatives COMAM and COOPPVM in Mananara. Their key customer, is a Swiss organic product distributer and locally their supported by Intercooperation, Slow Food and the nationalpark authorities of Madagascar. The sought after black gold in fair trade is a story of success: The chain from farmer to consumer is short, the vanilla farmer -cultivating in one of the worlds poorest countries- receives a fair price for his work.

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Die Kletterorchidee ist ein fleischiges, krautiges Rebengewächs und wächst bis zu einer Höhe von 10 bis 15 Metern, wobei es sich selbst an der Wirtspflanze mit Luftwurzeln abstützt. Direkte Sonnenbestrahlung wäre für die Pflanzen schädlich. Unter dem Schattendach der Bäume gedeiht die Vanilla planifolia am besten.

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Madagaskar gilt als einzigartiges Naturerbe. Nirgendwo auf der Welt ist die Artenvielfalt ähnlich gross. Die Abholzung des Regenwalds, Lebensraum von Mensch und Tier, schreitet jedoch dramatisch voran. Gemäss WWF sind auf Madagaskar nur noch zehn Prozent der einstigen Waldflächen erhalten. Die Bauern der Slow-Food-Genossenschaft setzen sich für den Schutz des Waldes ein. Eine Regel lautet: Wird ein Mitglied der illegalen Abholzung von Rosenholz überführt, schliesst es die Kooperative aus.

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Die echte Vanille ist die Frucht einer tropischen Orchidee. Sie wird im Mischwald in der Nähe der Dörfer sanft angebaut und bildet die Lebensgrundlage der Bauern.

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Die meisten Bauern besitzen neben ihren Vanilleplantagen und Nelkenbäumen eigene Reisfelder. Der Ertrag reicht meistens nicht zum Weiterverkauf, er dient ausschliesslich der Selbstversorgung.

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Die Mitglieder der Genossenschaft sind stolz eine «Carte de planteur», eine Anbauer-Karte der Kooperative, zu besitzen. Sie hat für sie den gleichen Stellenwert wie eine Identitätskarte.

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Vavitera ist 64 und baut seit acht Jahren in Antsirabe Vanille an. Mittlerweile besitzt sie eine Hektare Land, auf der 4500 Vanillepflanzen wachsen.Pro Morgen bestäubt die Vanillebäuerin 1000 Blüten.

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Die Gewürzvanille stammt ursprünglich aus Mexiko und Mittelamerika. Die französischen Kolonialisten brachten die Vanille von der Insel La Réunion, die früher Île Bourbon hiess, nach Madagaskar.

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In Mexiko und Zentralamerika wird die Vanille von Kolibris und Bienen bestäubt. In Madagaskar erfolgt die Bestäubung der importierten Orchideenart von Hand. Die einzelnen Blüten werden am frühen Morgen direkt nach der Öffnung bestäubt. Von der Bestäubung bis zur Ernte vergehen acht bis neun Monate. 

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Die Ehefrau des Vizepräsidenten der Genossenschaft sortiert und bündelt die Vanille mit einer Bastschnur in ihrer Hütte, in der ein wunderbar süsslicher Duft in der Luft liegt

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Bis sie im Hauptgeschäft in Mananara eintreffen, wo sie ihre Vanille verkaufen können, müssen die Genossenschafter oft stundenlange Fussmärsche zurücklegen. Zudem müssen unzählige Flüsse überquert werden.

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1 Vanillestange kostet in Europa 1 Euro. Für ein Kilo Bio-Vanille in 1. Qualität erhält der Bauer im Herkunftsland von der Genossenschaft rund 50 Franken. Das durchschnittliche Pro-Kopf-Einkommen in Madagaskar beträgt 420 Franken

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Vor der Ernte werden die bohnenähnlichen Schoten am Baum gestempelt: Der Stempel schützt die Bauern vor ungebetenen Räubern. Er ist aber auch eine Art Absender: Jede Schote kann später im Hauptgeschäft oder sogar im Handel bis zum Bauern zurückverfolgt werden.

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Nach der Ernte werden die Vanilleschoten sortiert und kurz in 60 Grad heissem Wasser blanchiert. Danach schwitzen sie einige Tage, in eine Wolldecke eingewickelt, in einer Holzkiste. Die Vanillebauern massieren ihre Schoten jeden Tag und trocknen sie an der Sonne.

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Damit die Vanille keinen Geschmacksverlust erleidet, muss sich gut geschützt und eingewickelt in Wachspapier in Kisten verpackt werden.

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Im Hauptgeschäft in Mananara arbeiten 50 Angestellte an sechs Tagen acht Stunden. Sie erhalten einen festen Lohn.

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Jede einzelne Schote wird von Hand geprüft und die Vanille muss einer Geruchsprüfung standhalten.

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Kontrollieren und ausrangieren in einer sinnlichen Duftwolke.

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Bei der Vanille existieren verschiedenen Qualitäten und Längen. Schwarze Vanille mit dem intensivsten Aroma und die rote Vanille welche vor allem für Pulver und Extrakt verwendet wird.

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Schatzkiste im Hauptgeschäft: In Mananara wird die Vanille der Genossenschafter ggesammelt und gelagert.

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Seit 2006 ist der Bourbon-Vanille aus Mananara Bio-zertifiziert.Jedes Jahr kann die Qualität gesteigert werden.

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Von Mananara nach Tamatave beginnt die Reise für die Vanille auf dem Seeweg. Danach geht es im Bauch eines Frachters nach Europa.

Val Bregaglia

Travel feature from Val Bregaglia, Switzerland/Italy.
published in annabelle 2008

Cinema Sil Plaz

Situated in the Alpine town of Illanz in Switzerland's Canton Graubünden, Cinema Sil Plaz breathes life into the community cultural scene.This independent cinema was set up by two local architects who went about transforming the space using local materials. The concept was to have a welcoming interior, a bar that allows moviegoers to linger and a stage for bands to perform. writer: Ivan Carvalho,
published in Monocle 2011

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Door in oak

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Porthole view of the auditorium

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Auditorium with rammedearth walls

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Cinema Sil Plaz entrance

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Architects Ramun Capaul and Gordian Blumenthal

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Bar's vintage tables and chairs

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Audience's view of the screen

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Leather upholstered seats

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The cinema box office sits next to the bar

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Projectionist's room

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Steel and oak bar and stools

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The perfect spot to enjoy a carafe of wine

Garden Route

Fair-Trade Hotels on Garden Route, South Africa
travel feature, published in SI Grün 08/2011

 

Ecological Comfort

Spend, consume and pollute less all the while living in a super confortable apartment. It's an utopia come true for the tenants of Château Millo, a building of sleek design with panoramic view situated in Plan-les-Ouates, a small Swiss town in the Canton of Genève. The residents live in one of seven buildings CODA ( Coopérative de l'Habitat Associatif) has constructed. They rent land from the municipality for an unbeatable price, on which they build affordable housing according to best environmental standards. Everyone benefits.The municipality dealing with shortage of affordable housing, the residents which pay half of an average rent, and the environment obviously. In Plan-les-Ouates residents of the Co'op spend 2.5 times less electricity than regular households the same size, 20% less gaz and their daily use of water holds at 95 litre, instead of the average 159 litre per day.

Tbourida

Berber tribes in Morocco have cultivated their vivid horse-riding games and fighting tradition, Fantasia, over the past twothousand years.
For long a spectacular team sport which was reserved for men, but since 2008 female rider teams fire their gunpowder loaded riffles alongside their male competitors.
The festively dressed riders on Arabian and Berber stallions imitate the fierce warrior attack on the enemy.
The Jury judges the equestrian groups in criteria, »harda« for the appearance of riders and horses, and »talqa« for the groups alignment and simultaneity of gun-fire.

Pays Basque

Flash Basque, France
Travel & Food feature published in French Glamour 07/2011

Liverpool

Dining in Liverpool, England
Travel & Food feature published in Saisonküche 07/2008

Extremadura

Extremadura- Delicias de España
Products & Producers
advertorial
Client: Globus AG delicatessa

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Full Moon, olive oil from olives harvested at full moon

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Ana Sanchez and her husband Juan Perez, producers Full Moon

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assortment of delights: Palmeritas de Yema, Rabitas Royal figpralines and short pastries

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cheese makers in production of Torta del Casar in Queseria Ganadera

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Torta del Casar

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Habla N°4 2006, Habla N°7 2007 and Habla del Silencio 2009

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Carmen Pinilla and Eduardo Corchero Madruga producers of the Jamón Ibérico.

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They mainly feast on acorns and their ham is a delicacy, pigs feeding under an oak tree

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Jamón Ibérico hanging out to dry, it's quality tested daily.

info

I'm still setting this new site up step by step, all material will be online by spring 2012,- love to have you back!

A like apple

A portrait series for the issue: A wie Apfel, published in der:die:das an monothematic magazine made in Zurich.
styling: Nadja Aebi

info

I'm still setting this new site version up, all material will be online by end of December 2011,-happy to have you back!

About Flurina Rothenberger

Flurina Rothenberger is a freelance documentary photographer based in Switzerland. Her work and projects focus primarily on social, cultural and ethical topics. The priority of stories from countries in Africa is rooted in her childhood and youth in Ivory Coast and a continuous admiration for the African continent. She studied Photography in Switzerland, at ECAL in Lausanne and Zurich University of Arts. In 2004 she was awarded the Swiss Design Prize. Her work about the African community in Switzerland »I don’t know where I’m going, but I’m on the way« was published at Edition Patrick Frey, Zürich.


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News

  • Costa Rica

    13.12.2012 - 19.12.2012

    Comissioned Feature about sustainable coffee farming
  • Senegal

    09.11.2012 - 29.11.2012

    NDOX Photo Project dealing with climate change and water pollution with the example of severe seasonal floods in the suburbs of Dakar
  • Oman

    24.10.2012 - 1.11.2012

    Comissioned Feature in Oman

  • Photo Award Greenpeace: In partnership with DU

    Award for "NDOX"- a Photo Project dealing with climate change and water pollution with the example of severe seasonal floods in the suburbs of Dakar

  • Senegal

    21.09.2012 - 18.10.2012

    NDOX Photo Project dealing with climate change and water pollution with the example of severe seasonal floods in the suburbs of Dakar
  • Jordan

    Comissiond feature september 2012

  • Haïti

    14.05.2012 - 27.05.2012

    Comissioned features in Haïti
  • Nepal

    09.03.2012 - 25.03.2012

    Comissioned features in Nepal
  • Ghana

    11.02.2012 - 28.02.2012

    Finishing a Project in Ghana

  • Sierra Leone

    07.11.2011 - 18.11.2011

    Working on a comissioned feature about the sustainable community project »Tribe Wanted« in Sierra Leone
    www.tribewanted.com

  • Media Prize 2011 Children's Rights

    04.11.2011

    The story »Risky Start« for annabelle was awarded with the German media prize 2011, which awards journalistic contributions in aim to strengthen the protection of children's rights.

Photography
Flurina Rothenberger

Flüelastrasse 6
8048 Zürich, Switzerland
phone +41 (0) 78 712 93 84
mail@flurinarothenberger.ch

Imprint

 

Images & content ⓒ 2000-2012 Flurina Rothenberger.
All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any form without written permission is strictly forbidden.

 

 

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